Showing result 51 to 60 of 218

Bangladesh: Grassroots in IYS in Bangladesh

The grassroots' consultations in Bangladesh during the IYS created broad political response and media recognition of the process; however, such achievements might be difficult to sustain.

Author: Dibalok Singha
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Geneva, Switzerland
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2009
Last updated: Mon, 10/05/2009 - 18:20

Cameroon joins the widening world of WSSCC

The newest National WASH Coalition was officially launched in Cameroon on 5 May by His Excellency the Head of Government Inoni Ephraim at a ceremony that was also attended by WSSCC Executive Director Jon Lane.

Source: WSSCC
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6 May 2009

WSSCC endorses sanitation as a human right

From 27 to 29 April WSSCC joined in an expert consultation to discuss the human rights obligations related to access to sanitation.

Source: WSSCC
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30 April 2009

Nigeria: reaching out to people in a language they understand

As a global language, English is useful, but to reach people locally, you have to speak with their tongue. For that reason, the National WASH Coalition in Nigeria, the National Task Group on Sanitation (NTGS), held a four-day advocacy materials translation workshop from 20 to 25 April in Jos, Nigeria, with WSSCC support.

Source: WSSCC
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27 April 2009

Editorial: are theory-driven behavior change interventions truly theory driven?

The article is a critical examination of how well investigations aimed at increasing physical activity behaviour conform to the theoretical constructs on which they are supposedly based.

Publications
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Author: Vicki S Conn (no email given)
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Last updated: Wed, 03/12/2014 - 13:43

WSSCC makes its mark at the 5th World Water Forum

WSSCC was active in March at the 5th World Water Forum, where the Secretariat promoted the work and interests of members and National WASH Coalitions.

Source: WSSCC
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25 March 2009

Can the emotion of disgust be harnessed to promote hand hygiene? Experimental and field-based tests

Two studies carried out in Sydney, Australia explored whether inducing disgust may be a useful addition to hand-hygiene interventions. Experiment 1 employed a novel laboratory measure of hand hygiene, and tested whether a brief (3-min) video-based intervention using disgust/education, improved hand hygiene relative to education alone and a control condition. On test, a week later, the disgust intervention significantly exceeded the education and control condition combined, although the effect size was modest. Experiment 2 examined the generality of this effect in a field study. During a baseline period, soap and paper towel use in a series of washrooms were covertly monitored. This was followed by an intervention period, in which two washrooms received disgust/education-based posters and a further two, educational posters, exhorting participants to wash their hands. A follow-up period, after the posters were removed, was also monitored. The disgust-based intervention was significantly better at promoting hand hygiene. These findings suggest that even brief disgust-based interventions may be successful and that these can be tested and developed under laboratory conditions.

Publications
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Author: Renata Porzig-Drummond, Richard Stevenson (richard.stevenson@psy.mq.edu.au), Trevor Case, Megan Oaten
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Last updated: Wed, 03/12/2014 - 15:44

New Steering Committee members elected

Between December 2008 and February 2009, members around the world voted in elections for open seats on the WSSCC Steering Committee.

Source: WSSCC
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24 March 2009

Scaling Up Household Water Treatment among Low Income Households

The report begins by defining scale in terms of both coverage (supply) and uptake (demand and correct/consistent use) by a vulnerable population. Section 2 examines efforts to scale up other important household-based interventions—sanitation, oral rehydration salts, guinea worm filters and insecticide-treated mosquito nets—for lessons of potential value to scaling up HWTS. Among the important recurring themes from such interventions are the need to 1) focus on the user’s attitudes and aspirations; 2) take advantage of simple technologies to minimize the need for intensive behaviour change promotion; 3) promote non-health benefits, such as cost savings, convenience and aesthetic appeal; 4) use schools, clinics and women’s groups to gain access to more vulnerable population segments; 5) take advantage of existing manufacturers and supply channels to extend coverage; 6) provide performance-based financial incentives to drive distribution; 7) align international support and cooperation to encourage large-scale donor funding; 8) use free distribution to achieve rapid scale-up and improve equity; 9) use targeted subsidies, where possible, to leverage donor funding; and 10) encourage internationally accepted standards to ensure product quality. Section 3 presents case-studies of the most common HWTS products and technologies that are being promoted by governments, United Nations (UN) agencies, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), social marketers and the private sector.

Publications
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Author: Clasen, T. WHO
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Last updated: Thu, 03/13/2014 - 15:16

Scaling Up Household Water Treatment among Low Income Households

The report begins by defining scale in terms of both coverage (supply) and uptake (demand and correct/consistent use) by a vulnerable population. Section 2 examines efforts to scale up other important household-based interventions—sanitation, oral rehydration salts, guinea worm filters and insecticide-treated mosquito nets—for lessons of potential value to scaling up HWTS. Among the important recurring themes from such interventions are the need to 1) focus on the user’s attitudes and aspirations; 2) take advantage of simple technologies to minimize the need for intensive behaviour change promotion; 3) promote non-health benefits, such as cost savings, convenience and aesthetic appeal; 4) use schools, clinics and women’s groups to gain access to more vulnerable population segments; 5) take advantage of existing manufacturers and supply channels to extend coverage; 6) provide performance-based financial incentives to drive distribution; 7) align international support and cooperation to encourage large-scale donor funding; 8) use free distribution to achieve rapid scale-up and improve equity; 9) use targeted subsidies, where possible, to leverage donor funding; and 10) encourage internationally accepted standards to ensure product quality. Section 3 presents case-studies of the most common HWTS products and technologies that are being promoted by governments, United Nations (UN) agencies, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), social marketers and the private sector.

Publications
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Author: Clasen, T. WHO
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Last updated: Wed, 03/12/2014 - 16:03