WSSCC joins fight for an end to extreme poverty by 2030 at Global Citizen Festival

Date: 25th September 2014

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WSSCC Executive Director Chris Williams will join over a dozen world leaders including, Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India; Sheikh Hasina, Prime Minister of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh; United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon; Jim Yong Kim, President of the World Bank Group; Erna Solberg, Prime Minister of Norway; Sushil Koirala, Prime Minister of Nepal; Hery Rajaonarimampianina, President of Madagascar;  Helle Thorning-Schmidt, Prime Minister of Denmark; Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia; Xavier Bettel, Prime Minister of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg, will participate in the 2014 Global Citizen Festival to voice tangible commitments that could affect the lives of 50 million people.

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These world leaders will join a star-studded line up of musicians, celebrity hosts including Hugh Jackman and Jessica Alba, and 60,000 Global Citizens on the Great Lawn of New York City’s Central Park on September 27, 2014. The free-ticketed concert will feature performances from JAY-Z, No Doubt, Carrie Underwood, fun. The Roots, and Tiësto, and will call for accelerated progress in the areas of vaccines, education and sanitation.

Hugh Evans, CEO of The Global Poverty Project, said, “It is a monumental acknowledgement of the actions taken by Global Citizens that Indian Prime Minister Modi and dozens of world leaders will take the stage at the Global Citizen Festival to announce extraordinary commitments on behalf of the world’s poor. We know that ending extreme poverty by 2030 is within our reach, but we need the support of political leaders around the world to accelerate the significant policy changes necessary to eliminate it altogether.”

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A high-level assembly of leaders from the public, private and social sectors will also take part in this year’s Festival. Børge Brende, Minister of Foreign Affairs, Norway; Mogens Jensen, Minister for Trade and Development Cooperation, Denmark, Junaid Ahmad, Senior Director for the World Bank Group’s Water Global Practice; Helena Thybell, Manager of H&M Conscious Foundation; Paul Polman, Chief Executive Officer of Unilever; Martin Riant, Group President, Global Baby, Feminine & Family Care of Procter & Gamble; Sarina Prabasi, Chief Executive Officer of WaterAid America; Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, Executive Director of UNFPA; H.R.H. Princess Madeleine of Sweden; Elmo & Raya, Sesame Street, will add their voices to further the movement to end extreme poverty by 2030.

Partners of the 2014 Global Citizen Festival, include WSSCC as well as Caterpillar Inc., Citi, H&M, World Childhood Foundation, The Riot House, Noise4Good, EKOCYCLE, BidKind, Universal Music Group, Clear Channel Media and Entertainment, and The Paramount Hotel. The Festival has also partnered with leading non-profit groups, including: UNFPA, the Global Partnership for Education, Gavi, The Vaccine Alliance, The Malala Fund, WaterAid America, WASH Advocates, U.S. Fund for UNICEF, and more.

MSNBC and NBC News are the official media partners for this year’s Festival.

For more information about the festival, visit: www.globalcitizenfestival.com.

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