Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene

Through collective behaviour change, we aim to ensure that our actions are sustainable, inclusive and climate resilient.
Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene

Through our Global Sanitation Fund programmes, we emphasize sustainability of interventions reaching for higher quality sanitation and hygiene access. GSF programmes also work to increase access to safely managed sanitation services along the entire sanitation chain.


A return to unhygienic behaviour, or the inability of community members to continue to meet all open defecation free criteria is referred to as slippage. WSSCC’s outcome survey methodology identifies slippage in GSF programmes and informs reorientation plans where necessary. Apart from the quality of infrastructure itself, known factors contributing to slippage include a lack of focus on Equality and Non-Discrimination, and the threats posed by climate change and extreme weather events.
 
In addition to achieving sustainable toilet use, GSF partners work with communities to ensure that a handwashing facility with water and soap is available at household level, and that household members wash their hands at all critical times.
Sustainable Sanitation and Hygiene

As WSSCC evolves into the Sanitation and Hygiene Fund, focus will also be on increasing sustainable water, sanitation, hygiene and MHH services in schools and health care facilities. The Fund will support countries to build integrated policies, strategies, mapping, and costed plans for the provision of equitable and sustainable WASH services and WASH related education at schools. This may include initial capital cost of new infrastructure and, where appropriate, rehabilitation. The Fund will further support knowledge and skill-building for boys and girls though the curriculum and school-based behaviour change programmes and the monitoring of WASH in health care facilities through national health management and information systems.

Sustaining gains in Madagascar

Sustaining gains in Madagascar

As the number of ODF villages increase, Fonds d’Appui pour l’Assainissement (FAA), the GSF programme in Madagascar, continues to work at slippage reduction. In a fragile political context and with limited resources, staff and capacity at local government level, FAA applies complementary strategies to address matters of sustainability, including working towards behavioural sustainability by strengthening local traditional community governance structures and involving community actors, such as Natural Leaders and Community Consultants in monitoring and follow up of interventions; ensuring technological/infrastructure sustainability by “triggering” demand for improved latrine technologies, strengthening supply chains of services and products, and where appropriate establishing Village Saving and Loans Associations (VSLA); and working closely with local traditional, political and institutional leaders to ensure all community interventions are anchored in existing local institutional structures to ensure continued support beyond the FAA programme cycle. By the end of 2019, these sustainability measures had been implemented in more than 17,000 out of the 21,000 villages declared ODF.