Results

Since 1990, our work has significantly contributed to the achievement of sanitation and hygiene services for millions of people.
Results

Since 1990, our work has significantly contributed to the achievement of sanitation and hygiene services for millions of people. The Global Sanitation Fund is a pooled global fund established by WSSCC and funded by its donors to gather and direct finance to help large numbers of people achieve improved sanitation and adopt good hygiene practices.


Through our Global Sanitation Fund, our grants have resulted millions of people with access to improved sanitation and handwashing facilities. We have worked collectively to share menstrual health and hygiene messages with people of all ages.Through our Global Sanitation Fund, our grants have resulted millions of people with access to improved sanitation and handwashing facilities. We have worked collectively to share menstrual health and hygiene messages with people of all ages.. In the last decade, WSSCC has contributed to the follwing results:

Results

Our Impact Around the World

People with access to improved sanitation facilities
28
M

People living in open defecation free environments

Communities
80,700

Communities declared open defecation free

icon
2,474

Targeted administrative areas declared open defecation free

People with access to improved sanitation facilities
20
M

People having access to an improved sanitation facility

Continuous Growth 2
28
M

People with access to a handwashing facility with soap/substitute on premises.

People/communities/administrative areas living in ODF environments according to national definitions: These indicators report on the total number of people/communities/administrative areas living in ODF-declared communities within the GSF programme areas.


This includes people living in communities officially certified as ODF by government bodies or verified by Executing Agencies and their partners (if there are no national verification processes).  ODF criteria are defined according to national standards, and programmes report results against national ODF definitions.

Communities

refer to a village-related social group, settlement or administrative division engaged by the programme. The definition of community is defined for each country programme.

A Targeted Administrative Areas (TAAs)

Can be a commune, a municipality, a district, a woreda, or any other nationally recognized administrative area. Often it is the principal unit of decentralized/local government and can be further sub-divided into lower levels of local government. The level of TAA that the programme works with is defined for each country programme and noted in the country results pages.

WSSCC Definition of ODF

Due to differences in national ODF definitions, results across countries, are not strictly comparable. In 2017 WSSCC instituted a minimum definition of ODF which includes: no faeces in the open, fly-proof / or improved latrines by JMP definitions of basic, limited and safely managed facilities and the presence of handwashing facilities on premised with water and soap/ash.  In the country results pages it is noted whether the national definitions of ODF adhere to this minimum WSSCC definition of ODF.

People with Handwashing Facilities with water and soap

This indicator reports on the number of people living in GSF programme areas who have access to a handwashing facility on premises with water and soap since the start of the programme. This definition adheres to the basic hygiene service level defined by the UNICEF/WHO Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP).
In some countries ash is still commonly used as a soap substitute. In those cases, the programme also reports on “access to a handwashing facility on premises with water and soap substitute (ash)”. These results are included in the country results

People with improved toilets

This indicator reports on the number of people living in GSF programme areas who have access to an improved sanitation facility since the start of the programme. Improved toilets are defined according to national standards, but to be included in this indicator these standards must meet or exceed the definition of basic, limited or safely managed service levels defined by the UNICEF/WHO Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP).
In some countries ash is still commonly used as a soap substitute. In those cases, the programme also reports on “access to a handwashing facility on premises with water and soap substitute (ash)”. These results are included in the country results.

  Sanitation Hygiene
Indicator Reducing open defecation Increasing access to improve sanitation Increasing access to handwashing with soap
We measure The increase in the number of people living in targeted administrative areas where Open Defecation Free (ODF) status has been verified using national systems.

The increase in the number of people that have access to and use an improved sanitation facility.

This includes limited, basic, and safely managed services.

The increase in the number of people that have access to a handwashing facility with soap/substitute and water.

This includes limited, basic, and safely managed services.

 

Sustaining gains in Madagascar

Sustaining gains in Madagascar 

As the number of ODF villages increases, Fonds d’Appui pours l’Assainissement (FAA), the GSF program in Madagascar, continues to work at slippage reduction.

In a fragile political context and with limited resources, staff and capacity at local government level, FAA applies complementary strategies to address matters of sustainability, including working towards behavioral sustainability by strengthening local traditional community governance structures and involving community actors, such as Natural Leaders and Community Consultants in monitoring and follow up of interventions; ensuring technological/infrastructure sustainability by “triggering” demand for improved latrine technologies, strengthening supply chains of services and products, and where appropriate establishing Village Saving and Loans Associations (VSLA); and working closely with local traditional, political and institutional leaders to ensure all community interventions are anchored in existing local institutional structures to ensure continued support beyond the FAA program cycle.

By the end of 2019, these sustainability measures had been implemented in more than 17,000 out of the 21,000 villages declared ODF.