Resources

This resource page provides you with quick access to some of our most popular publications, e-toolkits and knowledge resources to key issues. Please explore the below resources or contact us for help with sanitation, hygiene and water supply-related resources, research or ideas.


Resources

Gender disparities in water, sanitation, and global health

Equality
Celebrating World Water Day, The Lancet Editors, including WSSCC Programme Manager Archana Patkar, highlighted the gains made towards Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 7c, “to halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation”, and noted UN-Water's call for sustainable water management in view of future increases in demand and shortfalls in supply. As the primary water collectors worldwide, women are disproportionately affected by the scarcity of adequate resources; however, global estimates of improvements in water access do not reflect gender-disaggregated benefits and burdens.

10 raisons de devenir partenaire du Fonds Mondial Pour L’Assainissement

Global Sanitation Fund
Le Fonds Mondial pour l’Assainissement (GSF) investit dans les activités de changement de comportement qui permettent à un grand nombre de personnes dans les pays en développement d’améliorer leurs systèmes d’assainissement et d’adopter de bonnes pratiques d’hygiène. Établi en 2008 par le Conseil de Concertation pour l’Approvisionnement en Eau et l’Assainissement (WSSCC) hébergé par le Bureau des Nations Unies pour les services d’appui aux projets (UNOPS), le GSF est le seul fonds mondial consacré uniquement à l’assainissement et à l’hygiène. Fondé sur les communautés, il est soutenu par les autorités publiques et opère de façon commerciale. Les ménages et les autorités locales oeuvrent avec les entrepreneurs locaux et un réseau d’une centaine de partenaires : ensemble, ils contribuent à créer les conditions nécessaires pour que des dizaines de millions de personnes vivent dans des environnements sans défécation à l’air libre, et qu’elles aient accès à des toilettes et des installations de lavage des mains convenables.

10 reasons to partner with the Global Sanitation Fund

Global Sanitation Fund
The Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) invests in behaviour change activities that enable large numbers of people in developing countries to improve their sanitation and adopt good hygiene practices. Established in 2008 by the UNOPS-hosted Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), the GSF is the only global fund solely dedicated to sanitation and hygiene. The GSF is community-based, government-supported and commercially operated. Households and local governments work with local entrepreneurs and a network of hundreds of partners. Together, they create the conditions for tens of millions of people to live in open defecation free environments and access adequate toilets and handwashing facilities. Discover the 10 reasons to partner with the GSF in this brochure.

Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Women Practicing Poor Sanitation in Rural India

Equality
Pregnancy is usually a happy time for women and their families. But, for some women, pregnancy ends unhappily. Some women lose their baby during early pregnancy (spontaneous abortion or miscarriage) or during late pregnancy (stillbirth). Others have their baby earlier than expected (preterm birth) or have a baby with low birth weight, two outcomes that adversely affect the baby’s survival and long-term health. The burden of adverse pregnancy outcomes (low birth weight, preterm birth, stillbirth, and spontaneous abortion) is substantial across the world but is particularly high in resource-limited settings. Many risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes (APOs) have been identified, including infection, diabetes, poor antenatal care, and other socio-economic factors, but a clear causal mechanism for adverse pregnancy outcomes has not been established. This population-based study conducted in rural India assesses whether poor sanitation practices were associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth and low birth weight.

Menstrual Hygiene Practices, WASH Access and the Risk of Urogenital Infection in Women from Odisha

Equality
Menstrual hygiene management (MHM) practices vary worldwide and depend on the individual’s socioeconomic status, personal preferences, local traditions and beliefs, and access to water and sanitation resources. MHM practices can be particularly unhygienic and inconvenient for girls and women in poorer settings. Little is known about whether unhygienic MHM practices increase a woman’s exposure to urogenital infections, such as bacterial vaginosis (BV) and urinary tract infection (UTI). This study aimed to determine the association of MHM practices with urogenital infections, controlling for environmental drivers. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted on 486 women at Odisha, India.

A grounded theory study of women across the life-course in Odisha, India

Equality
While sanitation interventions have focused primarily on child health, women's unique health risks from inadequate sanitation are gaining recognition as a priority issue. This study examines the range of sanitation-related psychosocial stressors during routine sanitation practices in Odisha, India. Between August 2013 and March 2014, in-depth interviews with 56 women in four life stages were conducted: adolescent, newly married, pregnant and established adult women in three settings: urban slums, rural villages and indigenous villages. Using a grounded theory approach, the study team transcribed, translated, coded and discussed interviews using detailed analytic memos to identify and characterize stressors at each life stage and study site.