Resources

This resource page provides you with quick access to some of our most popular publications, e-toolkits and knowledge resources to key issues. Please explore the below resources or contact us for help with sanitation, hygiene and water supply-related resources, research or ideas.

5 resources found


Resources

Menstrual Hygiene Practices, WASH Access and the Risk of Urogenital Infection in Women from Odisha

Equality
Menstrual hygiene management (MHM) practices vary worldwide and depend on the individual’s socioeconomic status, personal preferences, local traditions and beliefs, and access to water and sanitation resources. MHM practices can be particularly unhygienic and inconvenient for girls and women in poorer settings. Little is known about whether unhygienic MHM practices increase a woman’s exposure to urogenital infections, such as bacterial vaginosis (BV) and urinary tract infection (UTI). This study aimed to determine the association of MHM practices with urogenital infections, controlling for environmental drivers. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted on 486 women at Odisha, India.

Inspiring Change for Women’s Rights and Dignity – Meeting Report

Equality
For every woman who is unafraid and every girl who can dream, millions remain unsung and uncelebrated, caught in a bleak cycle of toil and trauma. Condemned at birth in many societies to be the helper, producer, reproducer, water bearer, nurse, cleaner and housekeeper, women and girls know what the world has yet to recognize and value – denial of basic sanitation traps women in a cycle of silence, shame and denied opportunities. 8 March is a reminder of the struggles ahead even as we celebrate the gains. More women in parliament and in the boardroom, more men helping out at home and supporting their daughter’s, wife’s and mother’s aspirations does not mean that we are close to achieving parity in business, finance or politics. Most disturbing is the continued violation of basic human rights. We are entering an era of freer movement of information and capital, creating a wealth of opportunities that unfortunately place the voiceless and powerless even further behind as the world denies their basic rights to live with decency and dignity. On 8 March 2014, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights and WSSCC paid homage to the unsung feminine, reminding all present of the equal value of every human life and of our collective and individual obligation to fight stigma, discrimination and inequality. The meeting listened and learned. Using sanitation and hygiene as an entry point to explore human rights in the world’s poorest countries, we heard stories of struggle and success for women and communities in Nepal, India and Senegal.Pour chaque femme qui n’a pas peur et chaque fille qui peut rêver, des millions d’autres restent méconnues et anonymes, enfermées dans un sombre quotidien de labeur et de traumatismes. Condamnées dès la naissance à devenir des assistantes, des productrices, des reproductrices, des porteuses d’eau, des gardes malades, des femmes de ménage ou des maîtresses de maison, les femmes et les filles de nombreuses sociétés savent bien ce que le monde doit encore reconnaître et valoriser. Le déni d’installations sanitaires élémentaires les enferme dans un cercle de silence, de honte et d’opportunités manquées. En 2014, à l’occasion de la Journée internationale de la femme, le Haut-Commissariat aux droits de l’homme (HCDH) et le ont rendu hommage aux femmes anonymes, et rappelé à toutes les personnes présentes l’égale valeur de chaque être humain ainsi que notre obligation collective comme individuelle de combattre la stigmatisation, la discrimination et l’inégalité.

Menstrual Hygiene Management: Training of Master Trainers – New Delhi, India (24-27 September 2013)

Equality
This report presents the main highlights and insights from the Training of Trainers (ToT) on Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) Programme, which was run by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) from September 24- 27, 2013 in New Delhi with the support of the Indian Institute of Public Administration. The first of its kind, this national training initiative was organized with the objective of creating master trainers from Hindi-speaking states capable of returning to their communities as champions for a deeply stigmatized and taboo issue – an issue which is central to the dignity, health and well-being of women and girls. 62 participants from Uttar Pradesh, Jharkhand, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Uttarakhand and Delhi who attended the four-day training. The National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sectors were well-represented by government representatives and NGO practitioners.

A Systematic Review of the Health and Social Effects of Menstrual Hygiene Management

Equality
Menstruation is a natural and beneficial monthly occurrence in healthy adolescent girls and pre-menopausal adult women. It concerns women and men alike as it is among the key determinants of human reproduction and parenthood. Differing approaches to menstrual hygiene management (MHM) have been associated with a wide range of health and psycho-social outcomes in lower income settings. This paper collates, summarizes and critically appraises the peer-reviewed and published evidence on the health and psycho-social outcomes of the methods of MHM used in low and middle income countries and to assess the evidence for existing interventions such as educational programs and absorbent distribution.

Making Every Drop Count – Financing WASH in Ethiopia

Collaboration
One sixth of all Africans who need access to safe water live in Ethiopia. Without improving access to safe water, basic sanitation and hygiene, the MDG targets on infant mortality, girls’ access to primary education and poverty cannot and will not be met. This publication addresses the issue of financing these most vital, basic services. Many of the problems stem from poor financing, with NGOs and donors making up much of the shortfall. But where, exactly, are budgets being currently spent? Are the correct strategies in place, along with clear co-ordination? Which areas need to be extended and financed to deliver the biggest effect and best outcomes? These and many more issues are addressed in this snapshot of Water, Sanitation and Hygiene in Ethiopia. Clear assessments of the problems are outlined before short, medium and long-term recommendations are made, guiding the best approaches to deal with these problems.