Resources

This resource page provides you with quick access to some of our most popular publications, e-toolkits and knowledge resources to key issues. Please explore the below resources or contact us for help with sanitation, hygiene and water supply-related resources, research or ideas.

8 resources found


Resources

West and Central Africa Regional Rural Sanitation Workshop

In 2015 an estimated 38 per cent of the rural population of West and Central Africa practised open defecation (OD) while 31 per cent were reliant on unimproved sanitation facilities. Furthermore, 71 per cent of rural households had no handwashing facility, with an additional 23 per cent having a limited facility (one without water or soap) (JMP, 2017, data collected in 2015). Since then, progress has been made through Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) and other rural sanitation approaches that should be celebrated. However, some countries in the region have witnessed an increase in rural OD over the Millennium Development Goal period. In order to achieve universal safely managed sanitation in the region by 2030 the scale and pace will need to increase drastically. The CLTS Knowledge Hub, based at the Institute of Development Studies, WaterAid, WSSCC and UNICEF co-convened a regional workshop in Saly, Senegal, 25th-28th June 2018 with support from AGETIP. The event brought together those engaged in rural WASH programming from 14 countries across the region (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Democratic Republic Congo (DRC), Gambia, Ghana, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, and Togo) alongside experts working at regional and global levels. Over the course of four days participants shared latest experiences, innovations, challenges and research, mapped knowledge gaps and discussed ways forward with the aim of improving capacity and knowledge. This learning brief presents the common challenges identified across the region, summarises some of the discussions held, highlights some promising practices and considers priority actions moving forward.

WASH in the informal sector - CSW61 Presentation

Equality
In Niger, the lack of access to sanitation and scarcity of adequate information and facilities for Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) are considerable challenges for women, hindering their participation in society, a new study by WSSCC and UN/Women has found. The findings of the study were presented at a side event on Women’s access to sanitation and hygiene in the informal sector on March 20th, during the 61st Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) in New York.

East Africa Workshop on Scaling Up of CLTS and Enhancing Area Coverage – Nairobi, Kenya – 2014 Repor...

Collaboration
This document reports on an international workshop on Scaling up of CLTS and Enhancing Area Coverage: Running the last miles towards MDG sanitation targeting the next 24 months. The workshop brought together participants from eight African countries, as well as one Caribbean country, to share experience to date and chalk out strategies for moving the sanitation agenda forward over the next two years. Nearly all participants were highly experienced CLTS practitioners involved in mostly large-scale CLTS sanitation programmes. The workshop was designed to create a learning environment in which best practice, challenges and responses from the different countries could be shared, discussed, and where appropriate absorbed into the action plans of all countries. The eight African countries – hosts Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Somalia, Madagascar, Sudan, South Sudan and Ghana – represented a range of stages and scales of CLTS work, as well as a range of funding mechanisms and implementation modalities.

The Road to Total Sanitation: Notes from a field trip and workshop on scaling up in Africa

WSSCC General
The aim of this learning and sharing exercise was to: explore partners' activities on rural sanitation especially, but not limited to, CLTS, Sanitation Marketing and PHAST; build consensus on the key components needed to take CLTS and Sanitation Marketing to scale with equity and sustainability; further explore collaboration, linkages, and partnerships; and make recommendations on how to scale up which are transferable across all countries in the region. These notes reflect the conclusions, recommendations, and lessons learnt from this trip. They are based on a two-day workshop that was held directly following a field trip visiting various projects in Tanzania.

Listening

Equality
Despite decades of effort and billions of dollars, 1 billion people still lack safe water and almost 2.4 billion lack safe sanitation. The time has therefore come to re-orient national and international efforts in support of a different approach. ‘LISTENING’ is about that new approach. It is an approach which has learnt from the failures of the past and begun to achieve well-documented successes of its own. But it is an approach that is not yet universally accepted because of the many vested interests that stand in its way. In brief, decentralization and empowerment of people and communities to enable them to take more control of their own lives and to support them in achieving their own development goals must be the method and the aim. But this does not mean that the responsibility to mobilise additional resources for the poor, and to create an enabling environment within which they can move forward, should be abandoned. In fact the responsibility for initiating and supporting community-led approaches means an even greater and more demanding role for government. ‘LISTENING’ attempts to bring these lessons – through the voices of many of those who have been most closely involved – to a wider international audience.À L’ÉCOUTE - De ceux qui œuvrent avec les populations d’Afrique, d’Asie et d’Amérique latine à la réalisation des objectifs des Nations Unies sur l’accès à l’eau et l’assainissement.

Information letter 9 – WSSCC/UN Women Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation

Equality
Highlighting the main points and events since the second half of the year (July to December 2016), this information letter focuses on: Highlighting strengths and weaknesses of sanitation programmes in Senegal,- including sanitation expert findings, international norms and standards-, concrete steps on how to improve MHM in refugee camps in Cameroon through observations within three separate refugee camps that are home to some 38,000 men, women and children. Menstrual waste management in West and Central Africa is also covered reporting on a technical workshop hosted by the Senegal Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development in October. Also, Menstrual Hygiene Management is reaching main results in Cameroon after five municipalities have committed to integrate it into their budget plans, before key result of the MHM trainers platform and 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence Campaign are mentioned.Cette lettre d'information met l'accent sur les points et événements forts de la seconde moitié de l'année (de juillet à décembre 2016). Elle pointe les forces et les faiblesses des programmes d'assainissement au Sénégal, y compris les résultats de l’expert en assainissement, les normes internationales ; la façon d'améliorer la GHM dans les camps de réfugiés au Cameroun à travers des observations dans trois camps de réfugiés séparés qui accueillent quelque 38 000 hommes, femmes et enfants. La gestion des déchets menstruels en Afrique de l'Ouest et du Centre est également couverte suite à un atelier technique organisé par le Ministère sénégalais de l'environnement et du développement durable en octobre. En outre, la gestion de l'hygiène menstruelle obtient des résultats importants au Cameroun après que cinq municipalités se sont engagées à l'intégrer dans leurs plans budgétaires, avant de mentionner les résultats clés de la plateforme des formateurs en GHM et la campagne de 16 jours d'activisme contre la violence faite aux femmes.

Best Practices of the Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation

Equality
The Joint Programme on Gender, Hygiene and Sanitation is designed and implemented by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) in West and Central Africa. The Programme supports governments in the formulation of evidence based and inclusive policies that address the fulfilment of women’s and girls’ human rights to water and sanitation. One of the approaches of the programme is the training of trainers’ workshop for government officers who will act as agents of change and play a catalytic role in transforming sanitation, health and education policies to include women’s and girls’ rights. Over the last few years, the interconnectivity of sanitation with other sectors has become more and more evident. To achieve sanitation and hygiene for all, everywhere, it is critical to collaborate with other sectors, to develop new tools, systems and mechanisms for the delivery of WASH services in schools, markets, work places, public spaces, etc. After two years of implementation, the Joint Programme has contributed to filling knowledge gaps on sanitation and hygiene for women and girls living in West and Central Africa.Bonnes pratiques du programme conjoint genre hygiène et assainissement: Le Programme Conjoint Genre, Hygiène et Assainissement a été conçu et est mis en oeuvre par le Conseil de concertation pour l’approvisionnement en eau et l’assainissement (WSSCC) et l’Entité des Nations Unies pour l’égalité des sexes et l’autonomisation des femmes (ONU Femmes) en Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre. Ce Programme appuie les gouvernements pour la formulation de politiques inclusives basées sur les résultats de la recherche, en faveur de l’exercice des droits humains des femmes et des filles à l’eau et à l’assainissement. Une des approches de ce programme est la formation des formateurs destinée prioritairement aux fonctionnaires gouvernementaux qui serviront d’agents de changement et qui joueront un rôle catalytique dans la transformation des politiques en matière d’assainissement, de santé et d’éducation pour y inclure les droits des femmes et des filles. Ces dernières années, l’interconnexion de l’assainissement avec les autres secteurs est devenue de plus en plus évidente. Pour que l’hygiène et l’assainissement concernent tout un chacun, partout, il est indispensable de collaborer avec d’autres secteurs et d’élaborer de nouveaux outils, systèmes et mécanismes qui apporteront les services WASH dans les écoles, sur les marchés, sur les lieux de travail, dans les lieux publics, etc Au bout de deux années de mise en œuvre, le Programme conjoint a contribué à combler les lacunes dans la connaissance de l’hygiène et de l’assainissement pour les femmes et les filles vivant en Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre.