Resources

This resource page provides you with quick access to some of our most popular publications, e-toolkits and knowledge resources to key issues. Please explore the below resources or contact us for help with sanitation, hygiene and water supply-related resources, research or ideas.

8 resources found


Resources

Equality and Non-Discrimination Handbook for CLTS Facilitators - August 2019

The Equality and Non-discrimination (EQND) and Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) Handbook provides practical guidance for ensuring that behaviour change interventions leave no one behind. Drawing on experience from across the sector, this handbook is specifically targeted towards those implementing or supervising CLTS interventions at the community level. Key features include a summary of EQND principles, step-by-step guidance on applying these principles during pre-triggering, triggering meetings, and post-triggering follow-up visits, as well as annexes with practical tools, templates, and resources. Version française : bientôt disponible!

Gender and CLTS - CLTS engagement, outcomes and empowerment in Malagasy communities

Global Sanitation Fund
In order to better understand the link between gender dynamics and the impact of its Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) interventions, the GSF supported a study in a small number of communities in Madagascar in 2015. These communities are in the area covered by the GSF-supported programme in Madagascar, known locally as ‘Fonds d’Appui pour l’Assainissement’ (FAA). This ‘GSF in focus’ case study highlights and reflects on the study.Cette étude examine le lien entre la dynamique du genre et l’initiative d’assainissement total piloté par la communauté (ATPC) dans un petit nombre de communautés malgaches.

A gender case study of the experience and outcomes of FAA CLTS interventions in Madagascar

Global Sanitation Fund
This study explores the role that gender plays in shaping the experience and outcomes of the Fonds D’Appui pour l’assainissement (FAA) Community-led Total Sanitation (CLTS) interventions in Madagascar. Through a qualitative study in four villages in the Itasy region, this study finds that there is a difference in the way women and men actively engage in the CLTS process. Despite this, it finds that gender does not prevent people from realizing the benefits of sanitation and indeed some empowerment outcomes including increased respect, new roles for women and improved voice in the community around sanitation. However, the ability to contribute to decision-making and change gender stereotypes around roles and responsibilities, such as for cleaning and maintaining the toilet, raises questions for women and men’s long-term sanitation facilities and behaviours.

Report from the CLTS Sharing and Learning workshop at SACOSAN VI

Collaboration
On January 10 2016, the CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS, together with UNICEF and WSSCC, hosted a one-day Sharing and Learning workshop on Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), as part of and prior to the 6th South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN) in Dhaka, Bangladesh. More than 80 participants from different NGOs, international development agencies, government and research institutions representing from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Afghanistan, Bhutan, Maldives, Pakistan and Sri Lanka attended and discussed experiences, challenges and innovations in CLTS and WASH in the region and beyond.

Promising Pathways - Innovations and best practices in CLTS at scale

Global Sanitation Fund
Promising Pathways - The astonishing story of how Madagascar grew from 10 to 10,000 villages free of open-defecation in just three years. Based on fieldwork conducted at community and national levels in Madagascar, the research for this publication was guided by Kamal Kar, founder and pioneer of CLTS, and conducted by a CLTS Foundation team. Promising Pathways is one outcome of research into the process and practices of Community Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) as implemented by the Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) programme in Madagascar – known as the Fonds d’Appui pour l’Assainissement (FAA). This is one of the first programmes strongly engaging with the challenges of scaling up CLTS, and results are emerging as striking: in three and a half years, the FAA programme has achieved 7007 Open Defecation Free (ODF) communities; 728 ODF fokontany (sub-commune level units) and 15 entire ODF communes. The research on which this document draws aims to understand the factors behind FAA Madagascar’s emerging success, highlighting why and how particular strategies are contributing to the scale-up process.

East Africa Workshop on Scaling Up of CLTS and Enhancing Area Coverage – Nairobi, Kenya – 2014 Repor...

Collaboration
This document reports on an international workshop on Scaling up of CLTS and Enhancing Area Coverage: Running the last miles towards MDG sanitation targeting the next 24 months. The workshop brought together participants from eight African countries, as well as one Caribbean country, to share experience to date and chalk out strategies for moving the sanitation agenda forward over the next two years. Nearly all participants were highly experienced CLTS practitioners involved in mostly large-scale CLTS sanitation programmes. The workshop was designed to create a learning environment in which best practice, challenges and responses from the different countries could be shared, discussed, and where appropriate absorbed into the action plans of all countries. The eight African countries – hosts Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Somalia, Madagascar, Sudan, South Sudan and Ghana – represented a range of stages and scales of CLTS work, as well as a range of funding mechanisms and implementation modalities.

Local governance and sanitation: Eight lessons from Uganda

Global Sanitation Fund
Many non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations, as well as bilateral and multilateral donors, recognize the importance of closely working with governments in sanitation and hygiene programmes. Collective behaviour change approaches, such as Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), are also increasingly being embraced by governments as an alternative to traditional subsidy and enforcement-based approaches. This ‘GSF in focus’ case study presents eight lessons learned from the GSF-supported Uganda Sanitation Fund (USF) in coordinating, planning, and implementing CLTS at scale through a decentralized government system. The USF is the largest programme of its kind in Uganda. The programme, which began in 2011, is currently implemented by 30 District Local Governments under the overall management of the Ministry of Health. By September 2016, the USF reported helping over three million people live in open defecation free (ODF) environments.De nombreuses organisations non gouvernementales et intergouvernementales, ainsi que des donateurs bilatéraux et multilatéraux, reconnaissent l’importance de travailler en étroite collaboration avec les gouvernements dans le cadre des programmes d’assainissement et d’hygiène. Des approches collectives en matière de changement de comportement, telles que l’ATPC, sont de plus en plus adoptées par les gouvernements comme une alternative aux démarches traditionnelles axées sur les subventions et la répression. Cette étude de cas intitulée « Gros plan sur le GSF » présente huit enseignements tirés du programme du Fonds ougandais pour l’assainissement (USF) soutenu par le Fonds mondial pour l’assainissement (GSF) dans le cadre de la coordination, de la planification et de la mise en oeuvre de l’ATPC à grande échelle1 par l’intermédiaire d’un système administratif décentralisé. L’USF est le programme le plus important de ce genre en Ouganda. Débuté en 2011, il est actuellement mis en oeuvre par 30 gouvernements locaux de district2 sous la supervision du ministère de la Santé. En septembre 2016, l’USF a indiqué avoir aidé plus de trois millions de personnes à vivre dans un environnement exempt de défécation à l’air libre.

Integrating Equity and Inclusion in Collective Behaviour Change under Swachh Bharat Mission

Collaboration
This summary report summarizes the findings of the WSSCC and WaterAid India organized consultation in Delhi that brought together a small, select group of collective behaviour change trainers and professionals working on equity issues, such as different kinds of disability, participation and MHM, so that together they could explore different ways of integrating equity and inclusion into the existing CLTS module keeping in mind the needs of marginalized individuals and groups.WSSCC in partnership with WaterAid India organized a one-day consultation in Delhi that brought together a small, select group of collective behaviour change trainers and professionals working on equity issues, such as different kinds of disability, participation and MHM, so that together they could explore different ways of integrating equity and inclusion into the existing CLTS module keeping in mind the needs of marginalized individuals and groups. The consultation gave interesting insights on how trainers have tried to implement the SBM guidelines on equity and inclusion and the challenges they have faced. A list of practical steps was developed that can be taken at each stage of the CLTS process to ensure that marginalized individuals and their issues are included. These findings can be found in this narrative report.