Resources

This resource page provides you with quick access to some of our most popular publications, e-toolkits and knowledge resources to key issues. Please explore the below resources or contact us for help with sanitation, hygiene and water supply-related resources, research or ideas.

8 resources found


Resources

Evidence Gap Map: Mapping the evidence on WASH promotion in communities, schools and health facilities

Learning
This brief is based on the WASH evidence gap map: 2018 update by Hugh Waddington, Hannah Chirgwin, Duae Zehra, John Eyers and Sandy Cairncross. The 2018 update was funded by the WSSCC. The authors systematically searched for published and unpublished studies since the original 2014 WASH evidence gap map was produced and conducted new searches of behavioural outcomes and WASH provision in health facilities.Chirgwin, Duae Zehra, John Eyers and Sandy Cairncross. The 2018 update was funded by the WSSCC. The authors systematically searched for published and unpublished studies since the original 2014 WASH evidence gap map was produced and conducted new searches of behavioural outcomes and WASH provision in health facilities.

Health and Hygiene across the Life Course: World Health Assembly 2017 side session report

Equality
During the World Health Assembly 2017, the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC), SCA, Government of Kenya and WaterAid came together to share approaches to ensure good hygiene and health practices and to raise standards across the life course, from childhood to adolescence, from motherhood to menopause, to old age and responding to disabilities. The session took place in the morning on 24 May 2017 at the Intercontinental Hotel in Geneva, and was attended by more than 40 international delegates from UN agencies, private sector, member states, NGOs and academia.

2017 World Health Assembly Side Event: Health and Hygiene across the Life Course

Equality
Join WSSCC, SCA and WaterAid at the WHO World Health Assembly for a morning side event on Health and Hygiene across the Life Course

Global Action Plan – Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) in Health Care Facilities

Collaboration
In 2015, for the first time, WHO and UNICEF assessed the status of WASH in health care facilities in low- and middle-income countries. With a significant proportion of facilities without any services at all, WHO, UNICEF and partners committed at a global meeting to address the situation, with the aim of achieving universal access in all facilities, in all settings, by 2030. A global action plan with five change objectives was developed in March 2015. In the first phase of this work, four task teams (comprised of health and WASH specialists) are working to address five change objectives and produce tangible deliverables.

Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in health care facilities – Joint action for universal access a...

Collaboration
Despite the fundamental need of WASH for quality health service delivery, access to WASH in healthcare facilities is alarmingly poor. A 2015 WHO/UNICEF global report reveals that 38% of health care facilities have no source of water. To address these challenges, WHO, UNICEF and partners, including WaterAid, committed at a global meeting in March 2015 to immediately address the situation with the aim to ensure that all health care facilities in all settings have adequate water, sanitation and hygiene services by 2030.A global action plan with five change objectives, has been developed. In the first phase of this work, four task teams (comprised of health and WASH specialists) are working to address the change objectives and product tangible deliverables. Task teams include: Advocacy, Action and Leadership; Monitoring; Evidence and Operational Research; and Policies, Standards and Facility-based Improvements.

Gender disparities in water, sanitation, and global health

Equality
Celebrating World Water Day, The Lancet Editors, including WSSCC Programme Manager Archana Patkar, highlighted the gains made towards Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 7c, “to halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation”, and noted UN-Water's call for sustainable water management in view of future increases in demand and shortfalls in supply. As the primary water collectors worldwide, women are disproportionately affected by the scarcity of adequate resources; however, global estimates of improvements in water access do not reflect gender-disaggregated benefits and burdens.

MHM Training Manual - WASH & Health Practitioners

Equality
MHM Training Manual - EnglishMHM Training Manual - Hindi

ToT Manual - WASH and Health for Menstrual Hygiene Management

Equality
Training of Trainers Manual - EnglishTraining of Trainers Manual - Hindi