Resources

This resource page provides you with quick access to some of our most popular publications, e-toolkits and knowledge resources to key issues. Please explore the below resources or contact us for help with sanitation, hygiene and water supply-related resources, research or ideas.

4 resources found


Resources

Community-driven development for water and sanitation in urban areas – Its contribution to meeting t...

Collaboration
Community organizations working with local NGOs have been responsible for many of the most cost-effective initiatives to improve and extend provision for water and sanitation to low-income urban households. This has a growing relevance within an urbanizing world, with a large and increasing proportion of those with low incomes who lack provision living in urban areas. Along with considerable bearing on meeting the water and sanitation target within the Millennium Development Goals. This publication defines the scale of need before focusing on the role local, community-driven schemes provide in addressing the requirements of the unserved or ill-served in urban areas. Schemes that improved and extended provision for water and sanitation as a result of changes in approach by local governments and civil society organizations are detailed. This includes local initiatives not normally considered part of ‘water and sanitation’ which have been significant in improving and extending provision, especially squatter upgrading schemes, initiatives to provide land for new housing and measures to increase the availability of loans to support household and community investments in better housing. Often underpinning these successes were the partnerships offered to local government by organizations of the urban poor. The tools and methods used are examined along with the ‘local’ constraints to improving and extending provision for water and sanitation and how these can be successfully addressed.

Leave No One Behind Report and Posters

Equality
“Leave No One Behind” summarizes the sanitation and hygiene hopes and aspirations of thousands of women and men of different ages and physical ability, across rural and urban areas in eight South Asian countries. In these countries, over a billion people are without safe sanitation. They represent indi­viduals and groups rarely heard because they are seldom asked what their constraints are, what they need, how they cope and how they might design services differently to enable universal access and use.Poster - WomenPoster - GirlsPoster - InfantsPoster - ChildrenPoster - CaregiversPoster - Pregnant womenPoster - Women workers

Sanitation, Stress, and Life Stage: A Systematic Data Collection Study among Women in Odisha, India

Equality
Emerging evidence demonstrates how inadequate access to water and sanitation is linked to psychosocial stress, especially among women, forcing them to navigate social and physical barriers during their daily sanitation routines. This study examines sanitation-related psychosocial stress (SRPS) across women’s reproductive lives in three distinct geographic sites (urban slums, rural villages, and rural tribal villages) in Odisha, India. It explores daily sanitation practices of adolescent, newly married, pregnant, and established adult women and identified stressors encountered during sanitation.

Hand Washing Practice in ASEH Project Area – A Study for Impact Monitoring

Collaboration
This study examines the status and benefits of hand washing with cleaning agents at five critical times as part of the Advancing Sustainable Environmental Health (ASEH) project. It was the third part of a longitudinal study of a project in rural and urban areas of Bangladesh with an earlier baseline (2004) and mid-term impact study (2007). It was designed using an iterative Cluster Sampling Technique. The study reveals that knowledge about critical hand washing times increased significantly in both rural and urban areas at all five critical hand washing times, except for two critical times related to children in rural areas. Of respondents in rural and urban areas, 27% and 63% respectively have knowledge about all five critical times. Hand washing at these critical times increased in rural and urban areas, with the exception of hand washing before feeding young children in rural areas. Notably, 27% of people in rural and 32% of people in urban areas reported washing their hands properly at all five critical times. This paper was presented at the Hygiene Practitioners Workshop, Dhaka, Bangladesh, February 2010.