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Nupur shares her journey from the fear and isolation of first menses to becoming an MHM champion

Like India, a disproportionate number of Nigerians – over 110 million – have little or no access to improved sanitation.

In June, July and August WSSCC reached out to its members and partners in 16 countries through dedicated national consultations.

The reports cover the sanitation needs of vulnerable groups in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

The sixth South Asia Conference on Sanitation (Sacosan-VI) – the region’s leading water and sanitation hygiene (WASH) forum – is taking place in Bangladesh’s capital, Dhaka from 11-13 January, 2016. Supported by the eight-member South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation (Saarc) and held on a rotational basis in each member state, Sacosan is a biennial […]

Global Handwashing Day is the centerpiece of a week of activities that mobilize millions of people worldwide to wash their hands with soap. First launched by the Global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing on 15 October 2008, Global Handwashing Day is now an annual event designed to raise awareness and foster the practice of handwashing with […]

WSSCC would like to offer sincere sympathies to the family of Milon Bikash Paul, WSSCC National Coordinator for Bangladesh, who passed away on Tuesday.

Resources

Leave No One Behind – Country Reports

Equality
Leave No One Behind - Afghanistan Country Report: This report is one in a series of 8 country reports produced as a result of the Leave No One Behind consultative process. It captures the current WASH practices, challenges and aspirations of Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka vulnerable groups from Qarabagh, Paghman, Bagrami and Kabul districts of Kabul Province, Afghanistan.Leave No One Behind - Bangladesh Country Report: As part of the Leave No One Behind consultative process in South Asia, ten meetings were organised by the Bangladesh chapter of FANSA with women, adolescent girls, elderly, persons with disabilities, transgender people and sanitation workers and waste collectors in different parts of the country in collaboration with CSOs working with these groups.Leave No One Behind - Bhutan Country Report: This report is the outcome of a consultation with a group of women, adolescent girls, sanitation workers, people with disabilities and senior citizens, organised in Bhutan in November 2015 with support from FANSA and WSSCC. The purpose of this interaction was to gain an understanding of their current sanitation and hygiene status, practices and challenges in their daily life.Leave No One Behind - India Country Report: In India, eighteen consultation meetings were held across six states with participants from different vulnerable groups. A total of 999 people participated in these meetings, including 260 women and adolescent girls, 182 elderly people and persons with disabilities, 236 sanitation workers and waste pickers and 36 members of the transgender community. Modern Architects for Rural India (MARI) led the consultative process with the support of 30 local organisations.Leave No One Behind - Maldives Country Report: This report summarizes the main challenges as well as key asks of people with disabilities, adolescent school children, construction workers, fishermen, elderly and sanitation workers in Maldives with regard to access to hygiene and sanitation services. These groups raised their concerns in the consultation held by WaterCare in the Maldives National University at the initiative of FANSA and WSSCC.Leave No One Behind - Nepal Country Report: The consultations with vulnerable groups from different parts of the country was an opportunity to openly interact with individuals on their sanitation and hygiene experiences that are critical aspects of their well-being and dignity. Women and adolescent girls, elderly people, persons with disabilities and the sanitation workers actively participated in the consultations where they shared their life story and struggles without adequate sanitation facilities at the household level, at the workplace and in public places.Leave No One Behind - Pakistan Country Report: In Pakistan, a total of eight consultation meetings were held between October 29 and November 20, 2015 to capture the current WASH practices, the associated and coping strategies among women and adolescent girls, the elderly and disabled and sanitary workers and waste pickers. In total, 551 participants from urban, peri-urban, slums and rural parts of Pakistan participated in the consultations. They included 187 women and adolescent girls, 145 elderly and persons with disabilities, and 219 sanitation workers and waste segregators. The meetings were organized by Punjab Urban Resource Centre with support from 11 local partner organizations in eight districts of the country.Leave No One Behind – Sri Lanka Country Report: In Sri Lanka, six consultations were conducted with a total of 218 participants, including 75 sanitation workers, 55 plantation workers, 63 women, and 25 differently-abled people. Seven organizations representing the fishing community, plantation workers, persons with disabilities and municipal councils supported CEJ in organizing these consultations. Participants were given an opportunity to share their experiences and observations on WASH issues using participatory methods. This report captures the major points shared by these groups.

National Coordinators Report – Highlights 2015

Collaboration
Sixteen National Coordinators work within WASH coalitions in their home countries, leading WSSCC’s work, serving as coalition heads and spokespersons, and advocating on WASH issues. National Coordinators carry out national and local level networking, knowledge management, advocacy and communications activities, and working on facilitating and implementing Global Sanitation Fund (GSF) programme activities. Working with partners and networks, they aim to position sanitation and hygiene onto the national agenda and prioritize specific investments for sanitation and hygiene. This report shows how WSSCC's National Coordinators have increased the visibility of WSSCC in their respective countries and how their collective commitment has contributed to greater commitments from rights holders, duty bearers, the private sector and partners.Rapport des coordinateurs nationaux 2015 - Les coordinateurs nationaux du WSSCC sont actifs dans 16 pays d’Asie du Sud-Est, d’Afrique de l’Ouest, d’Asie du Sud et d’Afrique orientale et australe. En 2015, ils ont pu faciliter et entreprendre des activités variées, qui illustrent l’activisme local et mondial en faveur du secteur WASH, et le dynamisme de l’approche collaborative du WSSCC. Avec l’adoption des objectifs de développement durable (ODD) en septembre 2015, les coordinateurs nationaux continuent de contribuer à ce secteur en portant davantage attention aux questions d’expansion et d’équité, conformément aux nouveaux objectifs. Ils canalisent les efforts des coalitions WASH et des autorités publiques pour mettre fin à la pratique de la défécation à l’air libre, et veillent à ce que les améliorations sanitaires soient adaptées aux personnes vulnérables et aux groupes socialement marginalisés. Pour se concentrer sur l’expansion et l’équité, ils s’appuient sur les résultats et l’expérience des 13 programmes nationaux d’amélioration de l’assainissement et de l’hygiène soutenus par le GSF ainsi que sur les activités du WSSCC relatives à l’égalité et à la non-discrimination.

Report from the CLTS Sharing and Learning workshop at SACOSAN VI

Collaboration
On January 10 2016, the CLTS Knowledge Hub at IDS, together with UNICEF and WSSCC, hosted a one-day Sharing and Learning workshop on Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS), as part of and prior to the 6th South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN) in Dhaka, Bangladesh. More than 80 participants from different NGOs, international development agencies, government and research institutions representing from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Afghanistan, Bhutan, Maldives, Pakistan and Sri Lanka attended and discussed experiences, challenges and innovations in CLTS and WASH in the region and beyond.

Impact of inadequate access to WASH facilities on women and girls...

Equality
The SHARE Research Consortium and WSSCC formed a research partnership in 2013 to investigate the specific impact of inadequate access to water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities on women and girls in India and Bangladesh. These four briefing notes converge on the lack of safe and acceptable choices for women and girls. Links between unsafe sanitation and women and girls’ poor health in terms of stress and infections are raised and major evidence gaps are highlighted. The higher incidence of reproductive tract infections linked to poor menstrual hygiene management under socioeconomically deprived groups is striking.This study of how women’s psycho-social stress relates to inadequate sanitation highlights the range of women’s experiences.The findings of this study demonstrate that the lack of sanitation has important implications for the mental, social, and reproductive health of women in rural India.As demonstrated in the WASH & CLEAN study, visual assessment alone of cleanliness on maternity units is an inadequate basis on which to conclude safety in terms of potential pathogens.

India WASH Forum – WASH News and Policy Update e-Newsletter, Issu...

Collaboration
The India WASH Forum stands for an independent, credible voice in the water, sanitation and hygiene sector. The WASH News and Policy Update e-Newsletter  is issued every second month and acts as an open platform for engagement on contemporary issues in the Indian WASH sector and elsewhere. In the January 2015 issue, WASH experts provide an analytical perspective of ongoing developments, including the landmark judgment of the Mumbai High Court on the right to water as an integral part of the right to life, a new set of guidelines on the Swachh Bharat Mission launched in October 2014, and excerpts of a joint study carried out by WSSCC and the SHARE Research Consortium, investigating the specific impact of inadequate access to water, sanitation and hygiene facilities on women and girls in India and Bangladesh.

Equity and Inclusion in Sanitation and Hygiene in South Asia – A ...

Equality
There are two facets to the problem in South Asia, both of which are unacceptable. The first is a problem of scale: 716 million men, women, and children defecate in the open every day in South Asia, especially in rural areas: a veritable sanitation crisis that impairs progress in the region. Many districts in India, Nepal, and Pakistan fall in this category. The second, and in many ways more pernicious problem, particularly in South Asia, is one of exclusion, where different categories of people are not able to access and use safe sanitation facilities. These categories of people include those who are socially and economically marginalized or excluded, and those who cannot use standard designs. This catalytic working paper, including a bibliography, was developed for the Technical Session during the 4th South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN IV) Reaching the Unserved: Equity and Inclusion in South Asia. It is intended for discussion leading to collaborative action.

Hand Washing Practice in ASEH Project Area – A Study for Impact M...

Collaboration
This study examines the status and benefits of hand washing with cleaning agents at five critical times as part of the Advancing Sustainable Environmental Health (ASEH) project. It was the third part of a longitudinal study of a project in rural and urban areas of Bangladesh with an earlier baseline (2004) and mid-term impact study (2007). It was designed using an iterative Cluster Sampling Technique. The study reveals that knowledge about critical hand washing times increased significantly in both rural and urban areas at all five critical hand washing times, except for two critical times related to children in rural areas. Of respondents in rural and urban areas, 27% and 63% respectively have knowledge about all five critical times. Hand washing at these critical times increased in rural and urban areas, with the exception of hand washing before feeding young children in rural areas. Notably, 27% of people in rural and 32% of people in urban areas reported washing their hands properly at all five critical times. This paper was presented at the Hygiene Practitioners Workshop, Dhaka, Bangladesh, February 2010.